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Jens Dahlmann of LongHorn Steakhouse has lots of great tips when it comes to grilling

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Jens Dahlmann of LongHorn Steakhouse has lots of great tips when it comes to grilling

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Sure, for some folks, the Fourth of July is all about fireworks. But for the 75% of all Americans who own a grill or a smoker, the Fourth is our Nation's No. 1 holiday when it comes to grilling. Which is why 3 out of 4 of those folks will spend some time outside today working over a fire.

But here's the thing: Though 14 million Americans can cook a steak with confidence because they actually grill something every week, the rest of us - because we use our grill or smoker so infrequently ... Well, let's just say that we have no chops when it comes to dealing with chops (pork, veal or otherwise).

So what's a backyard chef supposed to in a situation like this when there's so much at steak ... er ... stake? Turn to someone who really knows their way around a grill for advice. People like Jens Dahlmann, the Vice President and Corporate Executive Chef for Darden Restaurant's LongHorn Steakhouse brand.

Given that Jens' father & grandfather were chefs, this is a guy who literally grew up in a kitchen. In his teens & twenties, Dahlmann worked in hotels & restaurants all over Switzerland & Germany. Once he was classically trained in the culinary arts, Jens then  jumped ship. Well, started working on cruise ships, I mean.

Anyway ... While working on Cunard's Sea Goddess, Dahlmann met Sirio Maccioni, the founder of Le Cirque 2000. Sirio was so impressed with Jens' skills in the kitchen that he offered him the opportunity to become sous-chef at this New York landmark. After four years of working in Manhattan, Dahlmann then headed south to become executive chef at Palm Beach's prestigious Café L'Europe.


Jens Dahlmann back during his Disney World days

And once Jens began wowing foodies in Florida, it wasn't all that long 'til the Mouse came a-calling. Mickey wanted Dahlmann to shake things up in the kitchen over at WDW's Flying Fish Café. And he did such a good job with that Disney's Boardwalk eatery the next thing Jens knew, he was then being asked to work his magic with the menu at the Contemporary Resort's California Grill.

From there, Dahlmann had a relatively meteoric rise at the Mouse House. Once he became Epcot's Food & Beverage general manager, it was only a matter of time before he wound up as the executive chef in charge of this theme park's annual International Food & Wine Festival. Which - under Jens' guidance - experienced some truly explosive growth.

"When I took on Food & Wine, that festival was only 35 days long and had gross revenues of just $5.5 million. When I left Disney in 2016, Food & Wine was now over 50 days long and that festival had gross revenues of $22 million," Dahlmann admitted during a recent sit-down. "I honestly loved those 13 years I spent at Disney. When I was working there, I learned so much because I was really cooking for America."

And it was exactly that sort of experience & expertise that Darden wanted to tap into when they lured Jens away from Mickey last year to become LongHorn Steakhouse's new Vice President and Corporate Executive Chef. But today ... Well, Dahlmann is offering tips to those of us who are thinking about cooking steak tips for the Fourth.


Photo by Jim Hill

"When you're planning on grilling this holiday, if you're looking for a successful result, the obvious place to start is with the quality of the meat you plan on cooking for your friends & family. If you want the best results here, don't be cheap when you go shopping. Spend the money necessary for a fresh filet or a New York strip. Better yet a Ribeye, a nice thick one with good marbling. Because when you look at the marbling on a steak, that's where all the flavor happens," Jens explained. "That said, you always have to remember that -- the higher you go with the quality of your meat -- the less time you're going to want that piece of meat to spend on the grill."

And speaking of cooking ... Before you even get started here, Jens suggests that you first take the time to check over all of your grilling equipment. Making sure that the grill itself is first scraped clean & then properly oiled before you then turn up the heat.

"If you're working with a dirty grill, when you go to turn your meat, it may wind up sticking to the grill. Or maybe those spices that you've just so carefully coated your steak with will wind up sticking to the grill, rather than your meat," Dahlmann continued. "Which is why it's always worth it to spend a few minutes prior to firing up your grill properly cleaning & oiling it."


Photo by Jim Hill

And speaking of heat ... Again, before you officially get started grilling here, Jens says that it's crucial to check your temperature gauges. Make sure that your char grill is set at 550 (so that it can then properly handle the thicker cuts of meat) and your flattop is set at 425 (so it can properly sear thinner pieces of meat).

Okay. Once you've bought the right cuts of quality meat, properly cleaned & oiled your grill, and then made sure that everything's set at the right temperature ("If you can only stand to hold your hand directly over the grill for two or three seconds, that's the right amount of heat," Dahlmann said), it's now time to season your steaks.

"Don't be afraid to be bold here. You can't be shy when it comes to seasoning your meat. You want to give it a nice coating. Largely because -- if you're using a char grill -- a lot of that seasoning is just going to fall off anyway," Jens stated. "It's up to you to decide what sort of seasoning you want to use here. Even just some salt & pepper will enhance a steak's flavor."

Then - according to Dahlmann - comes the really tough part. Which is placing your meat on the grill and then fighting the urge to flip it too early or too often.

"The biggest mistake that a lot of amateur cooks make is that they flip the steak too many times. The real key to a well-cooked piece of meat is just let it be, "Jens insisted. "Of course, if you're serving different cuts of meat at your Fourth of July feast, you always want to put your biggest thickest steak on the grill first. If you're also cooking a New York Strip, you want to put that one on a few minutes later. But after that, just let the grill do its job and flip your meat a total of three or four times, once every three minutes or so."

Of course, the last thing you want to do is overcook a quality piece of meat. Which is why Dahlmann suggests that - when it comes to grilling steaks - if you're going to err, err on the side of undercooking.

"You can always put a piece of meat back on the grill if it's slightly undercooked. When you over-cook something, all you can do then is start over with a brand-new piece of meat," Jens said. "Just be sure that you're using the correct cut of meat for the cooking result you're aiming for. If someone wants a rare or medium rare steak, you should go with a thicker cut of steak. If one of your guests wants their steak cooked medium or well, it's best to start with a thinner cut of meat."


Photo by Jim Hill

As you can see, the folks at Longhorn take grilling steaks seriously. How seriously? Just last week at Darden Corporate Headquarters in Orlando, seven of these brand's top grill masters (who - after weeks of regional competitions - had been culled from the 491 restaurants that make up this chain) competed for a $10,000 prize in the Company's second annual Steak Master Series. And Dahlmann was one of the people who stood in Darden's test kitchens, watching like a hawk as each of the contestants struggled to prepare six different dishes in just 20 minutes according to Longhorn Steakhouse's exacting standards.

"I love that Darden does this. Recognizing the best of the best who work this restaurant," Jens concluded. "We have a lot of people here who are incredibly knowledgeable & passionate when it comes to grilling."

Speaking of which ... If today's story doesn't include the exact piece of info that you need to properly grill that T-bone, just whip out your iPhone & text GRILL to 55702. Or - better yet - visit  ExpertGriller.com prior to firing up your grill or smoker later today. 

This article was originally published by the Huffington Post on Tuesday, July 4, 2017

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